dancefloor

On November 9, Princeton’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Advising, Resources, & Education office (Can we think of a shorter name please?) shared an infographic presenting advise regarding “consent on the dance floor” to those attending the following Friday’s Orange and Black Ball (OBB).

“Dance consent” consists of asking someone if they want to dance, then awaiting an affirmative reply. The infographic suggests that the individual who initiated contact “frequently” assess the situation by asking questions and making statements like: “Hey, are you still into this?” and “We can stop if you aren’t.”

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Princeton "Dance Consent" Infographic.

Consent, as in one’s stated desire to participate in a given activity, is an incredibly important matter, but this infographic takes anything rational about the idea, and runs it into the ground.

The way in which “consent on the dance floor” is depicted is almost insulting to the person who’s “frequently” being asked followup questions; it assumes that they’re incapable of extricating themselves from an awkward life situation without first being prompted by the person with whom they’re interacting.

Additionally, whoever designed the infographic seems to be assuming an extraordinary lack of emotional intelligence on the part of the person initiating the dance.

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This is a perfect illustration of the continued infantilization of college students. After nearly two decades of learning the subtleties of human interaction, the majority of men and women should have evolved the means, both mentally and emotionally, to interact with another person without having to walk through a grade school-level tutorial.

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