Mexico Walks Back Promise Of Harvey Relief Funds For Texas

After the devastation hurricane Harvey left in the greater Houston, Texas area — the out pouring of support was huge. An unlikely source of help chimed in and promised a donation to help the efforts. Mexico offered to contribute!

On Tuesday, the Mexican Embassy in Washington formally sent a diplomatic note to the State Department offering humanitarian assistance to the victims of Hurricane Harvey. The Mexican foreign ministry had issued a news release over the weekend signaling the move and noting that it was acting “as good neighbors should always do in times of difficulty.” The New York Times reported.

Many missed it but Mexico had their own natural disaster strike shortly after. An earthquake that measured out at 8+ on the Richter Scale shook the country.

While the US is currently juggling the relief of two hurricanes of Harvey and Irma, it appears that Mexico rather focus their time and money on just their Earthquake.

The Independent reported:

“Given this situation, the Mexican government will channel all available logistical support to the families and communities that have been affected in Mexico and has informed the Texas and US governments that, unfortunately, on this occasion, it won’t be possible to provide the assistance originally offered to Texas in late August in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.”

While no one can be certain of the conversations going on behind the screen, President Trump didn’t seem to jump at the offer from mexico when it was made. He continued to Tweet about the Mexican crime rate being among the worlds highest. For some reason this was meet with high criticism, when in fact its very true.

NPR reports Mexico is the worlds second most VIOLENT country.

Mexico’s government is contesting a new international report that says the country had 23,000 homicides in 2016 — a level surpassed only by Syria. The International Institute for Strategic Studies says that intense violence fueled by Mexico’s drug cartels has reached the level of an armed conflict.

“Mexico’s murder rate rose dramatically last year, and 2017 doesn’t look much better. The homicide rate for the first three months of this year is the deadliest since the height of the drug war in 2011.”