MSNBC pundit says 'fears of brown people' motivated President Trump voters

On Sunday, former Salon.com editor and current MSNBC contributor Joan Walsh explained her deep theory on why Americans voted for Trump: they are racist – I know shocker right.

Yes, really.

The author of “What’s the Matter with White People?” may have found her answer: “fears of brown people.”

Joan Walsh, the National Affairs correspondent for The Nation and an MSNBC political analyst, used a weekend spot on MSNBC’s “AM Joy” to say “really good research” had essentially proven voters who cast a ballot for President Trump were simply racists.

“The really good research that’s taken place since the election shows that fear of a changing America is the number one factor that you can see drive really the divides, a white Trump voter from a white non-Trump voter, that it’s fears of brown people, fears of losing the majority,” Walsh said.

Walsh went on to suggest that Irish Catholic working class voters who chose Trump were no longer patriotic because they didn’t support the investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the presidential election – which has so far yielded no indictments nor hard evidence of Trump collusion.

“But you know what’s also sad to me is that this cohort, I wrote about my Irish Catholic working class family, this cohort used to be so patriotic, and so much America—love it or leave it, things that I didn’t like about it, but that was just so stirred by this country’s—what they perceived as its values and much of the same cohort is with Donald Trump—dismissing the Russia allegations, doing nothing to support the people who are trying to get answers, and I find this kind of relative, this relativity about well, you know, if my guy doesn’t think it’s important or if my guy might even be threatened by it, then I don’t care either,” Walsh said. “That is not patriotism. That is something else entirely.”

She stated, “Well I think it’s inescapable that’s part of it. The really good research that’s taken place since the election shows that fear of a changing America is the number one factor that you can see drive really the divides, a white Trump voter from a white non-Trump voter, that it’s fears of brown people, fears of losing the majority.”

Actually, the data doesn’t show that at all. What it shows is that Americans have reacted horribly to the Left’s purposeful polarization of politics along racial lines. The study most relied on by the Left, the 2016 American National Election Study, found that many white Trump voters believed that merit should outweigh diversity. The study’s author equated that stance with racism: “Rather than asking overtly prejudiced questions — ‘do you believe blacks are lazy’ — we ask whether racial inequalities today are a result of social bias or personal lack of effort and irresponsibility.”

This is insane. You don’t have to believe that black people are inherently lazy (which would be racist) to believe that most people in America who aren’t succeeding — of all races — are failing because they are making lazy or irresponsible choices (not racist, and also true). And yet it has become received, common wisdom that Americans who believe such a thing must secretly be motivated by racism.

Actually, it’s the general attitude toward America as a place of opportunity that moved Trump voters, not racism. Because the Democrats have spent two generations spouting that racial minorities are inherently victims of the evil American system — and thanks to generations of Democratic racism before that — many members of minorities believe that America has set up ever-present obstacles to their success. Democrats then trade on that perception in order to alienate voters who believe that America can provide everyone opportunity. And many Trump voters respond to that negativity by voting in the opposite direction.

Polls actually show that white Republicans and Democrats are similarly racist — if there is a racism gap, it’s relatively minor. Before Obama, any differences between Republicans and Democrats fell within the margin of error.

But the “racist Republicans” narrative allows Democrats to sleep well at night, secure in the sense of their own unearned moral superiority.